A Jurisdiction is a private set of laws

A Jurisdiction is a private set of laws / codes / statutes / rules / regulations of a private society.

The common law true is the basis of all law. This is not to be mistaken with the Common Law Jurisdiction that the courts often administer which is really the fundamental true common law that is constrained by a created private legal system developed through decisions of courts and similar tribunals.

People often take on the court’s offered Common Law Jurisdiction when they contract with the court and accept the created private legal system developed through decisions of courts. But you don’t have to do this, and you can stay in true common law, as explained by Bill Thornton and Clive Boustred . This is done by not pleading (not entering a plea).

The common law true is the fundamental basis of all private societies, under which the society as a Trust is created and their jurisdiction (their private laws of the society) is defined, including the entities and any roles under it.

Regarding entering a plea…

If you plead yes Guilty, you are; 1, Accepting the entered private law in the case, and 2, Accepting that you broke the private law that you just accepted you stand under.
If you plead Not Guilty, you are; 1. Accepting the entered private law in the case, and 2, Denying that you broke the private law that you just accepted you stand under.

Either way, by entering a plea, you are not challenging their claim that they have jurisdiction over you, you are accepting that you under-stand (stand under) their law, and you are only arguing (under their private law) whether you did or did not break it.

Either way, you submit to their jurisdiction (private set of laws / rules).

– Absolutely do not enter a plea. – Do Not Plea – Do not contract with them! (3 mins)

This is in Criminal Proceedings. There is a similar way in Civil Proceedings. Either way the law must be entered into the court.

If you don’t want to accept the other party’s jurisdiction, then you must challenge that jurisdiction, whether it is Criminal or Civil. Only the names (titles) of the entered forms to the court differ, but it is the body – the substance – of the document that matters.

Note. There are two things that you have to be careful not to submit to…
i. The constrained jurisdiction of the court’s rules – i.e. their Common Law Jurisdiction.
ii. The entered private law that is being presented by the other party.

If you are going to court, you want the court under your control so that you can challenge the other party.

As Bill Thornton explains in detail, by not submitting to their Common Law Jurisdiction (which is constrained by their legal system – an extended set of private rulings) then you may establish your own “court of record”, challenge the other party’s jurisdiction (with a counterclaim) and enter you own rulings to be tried by yourself or the tribunal.

You can stay out of the court’s offered Common Law Jurisdiction (their private constrained rulings around the common law) and stay in common law true (with the freedom to introduce any law or ruling you wish) by entering the court in special appearance only. This is best done in writing though when you make a claim or counterclaim, or a declaration to the court that you are dealing with. Then you can always simply refer to what is on record in the court.

This entry was posted in Common Law and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.